Quick Answer: Could You Please Vs May You Please?

Can I and may I Difference?

May is the more formal word, and if you are at all concerned about being tut-tutted, a safe choice.

Can is now the verb of choice for ability, and both can and may are still used in the “possibility” sense.

You may use can if you wish, and you can use may if it makes you feel better..

Can you or will you?

May implies that you are asking for permission. Can implies that you are questioning somebody’s ability. Will implies that you are seeking an answer about the future.

How do I ask for help?

4 Tips to Ask for (and Get) HelpBe concise and specific. Asking for and offering help can only be productive under one crucial condition: clear communication. … Don’t apologize. Don’t apologize for asking for help. … Make it personal, not transactional. Don’t ask for help over email or text. … Follow up with results.

Is it grammatically correct to say may you please?

The problem with “may you please” is not only that it’s grammatically redundant, “may” being a modal for humbly asking permission to do something and “please” being a function word for also expressing politeness when making a request.

Can and could grammar?

Can, like could and would, is used to ask a polite question, but can is only used to ask permission to do or say something (“Can I borrow your car?” “Can I get you something to drink?”). Could is the past tense of can, but it also has uses apart from that–and that is where the confusion lies.

Can I speak to or may I speak to?

“May I speak to …” asks for permission. “Can I speak to …” says you’re not asking for permission, you want so speak to … if it’s at all possible. You have a better chance of getting through to … if you use “can.” No, actually there’s no difference, except that “may” marks you as a stickler for formal grammar.

Could you please or can you please which is more polite?

“Could” is the polite form of “can”—so both are correct, but we use them in different situations. We use “can” when we are telling someone to do something. We use “could” when we are making a request. Teacher to students: “Can you please be quiet!”

Can you vs please?

Both are correct. The first is more direct, and the second is more polite. Could you please . . . gives slightly more room for refusal than Can you please . . .

Is could you please a question?

Depending on context, a sentence may or may not merit a question mark. … Question marks should not follow questions that are disguised requests: “Could you please close the door on your way out.” (In writing, such requests are best rendered more concisely: “Please close the door on your way out.”)

Can you leave or leave May?

In common English, people use “can” and “may” interchangeably. But traditionally, “can” implies ability (you are physically able to open the door and walk away), whereas “may” implies permission. If the person asks “may I leave,” then the safest positive answer is “yes you may” (or just yes).

How do you politely ask for help?

(To) give (someone) a hand / (To) lend (someone) a hand. This is another really common way to ask for help in English. … To help someone out. Help me out, help you out, help them out. … (To) help out. It can be with assistance or it can be with money. … (To) do (someone) a favour. … I could use some help. … I could use a hand.

Would you please vs Could you please?

But I would suppose that “would” is more polite, because it expresses the idea of probability, and of willingness, and of the desire that something be done, whereas “could” is more in the realm of ability (yes I can). And according to the American Heritage Dictionary, “would” is used to make a polite request.

Can I ask you or may I ask you?

But the permission use of can is not in fact incorrect in standard English. The only difference between the two verbs is that one is more polite than the other. In informal contexts it’s perfectly acceptable to use can; in formal situations it would be better to use may.

When to say may I?

As for May I at the start of a sentence, its commonest use is as a rhetorical device – typically in a speech or official meeting – for introducing a statement or suggestion (rather than a question): May I say how deeply honoured I am to be invited to chair the NCVO.

Could you please help me meaning?

Could you help me is a polite way of saying “Will you please take the time to help me?” It should be said with a diffident smile, and delivered not as a demand, but as a request.